1. Dark Colonnade (by jamescharlick)

    The Barjarg limeworks began operations in 1788 on the estate of the Hunters of Barjarg and in 1794 they employed as many as 40 seasonal labourers.

    Eventually railways, changes in agricultural practice and the practical issues involved in operating limeworks instigated a major decline in the industry to the extent that, by 1891 only four people were still employed in limeworks in the whole of Dumfriesshire. Barjarg itself finally ceased operations in 1904.

    A water wheel with a diameter in excess of 1 meter was installed underground to power a pump and drain the mine to prevent the flooding evident today. Water flows freely into the mine in several places providing a constant background chatter as it echoes throughout the quarry.

     
  2. Subterranea (by jamescharlick)

    The Barjarg limeworks began operations in 1788 on the estate of the Hunters of Barjarg and in 1794 they employed as many as 40 seasonal labourers.

    Eventually railways, changes in agricultural practice and the practical issues involved in operating limeworks instigated a major decline in the industry to the extent that, by 1891 only four people were still employed in limeworks in the whole of Dumfriesshire. Barjarg itself finally ceased operations in 1904.

    A water wheel with a diameter in excess of 1 meter was installed underground to power a pump and drain the mine to prevent the flooding evident today. Water flows freely into the mine in several places providing a constant background chatter as it echoes throughout the quarry.

     
  3. Just a reminder than if anyone wants to put in a print order before Xmas the deadline is fast approaching for international postage. 

    If anyone would like one of my lovely 15” x 10” photos on their wall please get in touch, either here or through my etsy.

    If the image you would like is not currently in the shop just drop me a note and I’ll add it for you!

    Thanks!

     
  4. III : Replica (by jamescharlick)

    We become mechanized.

    Normal service will be resumed shortly.

     
  5. II : Archetype (by jamescharlick)

    Strain upon the structure.

     
  6. I : Descent (by jamescharlick)

    Forgotten and displaced.

     
  7. Zenith (by jamescharlick)

    Abbey Mills Pumping Station is a Victorian sewage pumping station dating back to 1865, nicknamed the Cathedral of Sewage because of it’s elaborate, ornate Byzantine architecture style.

    The station takes it’s name from a water mill which was replaced by the pumping station and owned by the local abbey.

    Abbey Mills was built in association with the Northern Outfall Sewer which was built in the 1860s to carry the increasing amount of sewage produced in London away from the centre of the city. 

    It is still in full working order and occasionally works as a back-up to the adjacent modern pumping station.

    As you can imagine, walking around such a magnificent structure was quite an experience!

     
  8. Memoirs (by jamescharlick)

    This school occupies what used to be the estate mansion dating back to 1855, an estate which remained in the family until after WWII when it was eventually sold. The school finally closed in 1999 and the subsequent theft of the lead from the roof has led to some serious structural issues throughout. 

    This is a particularly old photo from around 15 months ago. I wasn’t very happy with my photos from the school since it was in such a bad state of disrepair and vandalism, but looking back this is actually a rather nice image I think.

     
  9. Absent Congregation (by jamescharlick)

    Dating back to 1891, this church has not seen a congregation since the early 1980s. 

    There is a strange mix of styles here, featuring late classical-neo Georgian architecture with a Greek style frontage, and inside a rounded mezzanine under a beautifully paneled ceiling with fantastic wagon wheel chandeliers. It’s unlike anywhere else I’ve seen in the UK

    The detailed ironwork sitting at the edge of the mezzanine is the remains of the second chandelier which has now fallen from the ceiling.

     
  10. Awake At Night (by jamescharlick)

    Some late night relaxation after light painting elsewhere in the city.

     
  11. Assembly (by jamescharlick)

    Dating back to 1891, this church has not seen a congregation since the early 1980s. 

    There is a strange mix of styles here, featuring late classical-neo Georgian architecture with a Greek style frontage, and inside a rounded mezzanine under a beautifully paneled ceiling with fantastic wagon wheel chandeliers. It’s unlike anywhere else I’ve seen in the UK.

     
  12. Vintage Sleaze (by jamescharlick)

    A rather odd first glimpse at my snaps from a recent holiday in Belgium and Luxembourg, but I couldn’t walk past without getting the camera out. I love this vintage style poster and store front as a whole, it looked like it hadn’t been restyled in 50 years.

    We were staying in a hotel about 10 doors down (found and booked by my other half before you ask), I can’t help but think we were lucky not to be renting the room by the hour ;)

     
  13. D Light (by jamescharlick)

    A second visit to this vast underground reservoir with brick archways vanishing off into the darkness in every direction.

    An immense space of wonderfully intricate Victorian brickwork that very few people ever get to see.

    Again just the one photo from the visit, because they take a fair while and I like to help others take theirs too :)

     
  14. Hush (by jamescharlick)

    Grand buildings on this site date back to the 14th century, and after being demolished and rebuilt several times the current building dates back to around 1850. 

    It was a manor house, a junior school, used by the US Air Force during The First World War, and then used again as a boarding school from the 60’s until 1990. 

    Shortly before the schools final closure several teachers were prosecuted for sexual abuse of the children.

     
  15. Teamwork (by jamescharlick)

    Grand buildings on this site date back to the 14th century, and after being demolished and rebuilt several times the current building dates back to around 1850. 

    It was a manor house, a junior school, used by the US Air Force during The First World War, and then used again as a boarding school from the 60’s until 1990. 

    Shortly before the schools final closure several teachers were prosecuted for sexual abuse of the children.