1. Cruciform (by jamescharlick)

    Singapore’s Blessed Sacrament Church was granted conservation status in 2005 because of the wonderful and unique architecture. The most iconic feature is the slate roof which is constructed in folds in the shape of a tent, symbolising the “tent of meeting” in the Old Testament. The roof appears to fall to the ground to wrap the interior, with portions touching the ground and resemble anchoring pegs.

    Inside the roof has integrated slits of glass panels at the junctions where the four portions of the cruciform shape meet, creating a dramatic play of light and shadows, which visually draws the eye upwards and cleverly brings light into the building.

    The timber ceiling panels create a warm atmosphere of solidity and strength within the worship hall.

     
  2. On A Starry Night (by jamescharlick)

    The main timbers of the Carlisle Cathedral ceiling date from 1400 after the fire of 1292, and the distinctive decorative scheme is from Ewan Christian’s restoration of the Cathedral 1853 – 6. The style we see of the restoration followed the medieval original, but the detailed design and colour of the ceiling with the angles and stars was the work of Owen Jones (1809 – 1874), who was one of the great decorative artists of the day. It was last repainted in 1970.

     
  3. Forsaken (by jamescharlick)

    Built in around 1100, St Dunstan-in-the-East was a Church of England parish church on St Dunstan’s Hill, half way between London Bridge and the Tower of London in the City of London. 

    After suffering sever damage during the Blitz of 1941 where only the Tower and Steeple survived unscathed, the decision was made to turn the church ruins into a public garden rather than rebuild.

    It is now a tranquil little oasis amid the bustle of London’s central business district.

     
  4. Sint-Salvator Cathedral (by jamescharlick)

    Since the 10th century the Sint-Salvator was a common parish church, but in the late 18th century the French occupiers of Bruges threw out the bishop of Bruges and destroyed the Sint-Donatius Cathedral.

    After Belgium’s independence in 1830 a new Bishop was sent to Bruges and Sint-Salvator was elevated to Cathedral status. However much building work needed to be done to develop the church into it’s new title, with a new tower and ceiling/roof being the major additions.

    The cathedral is currently undergoing some extensive renovations so using a tripod was unfortunately prohibited for much of the visit. I think this was my only good shot.

     
  5. Absent Congregation (by jamescharlick)

    Dating back to 1891, this church has not seen a congregation since the early 1980s. 

    There is a strange mix of styles here, featuring late classical-neo Georgian architecture with a Greek style frontage, and inside a rounded mezzanine under a beautifully paneled ceiling with fantastic wagon wheel chandeliers. It’s unlike anywhere else I’ve seen in the UK

    The detailed ironwork sitting at the edge of the mezzanine is the remains of the second chandelier which has now fallen from the ceiling.

     
  6. Assembly (by jamescharlick)

    Dating back to 1891, this church has not seen a congregation since the early 1980s. 

    There is a strange mix of styles here, featuring late classical-neo Georgian architecture with a Greek style frontage, and inside a rounded mezzanine under a beautifully paneled ceiling with fantastic wagon wheel chandeliers. It’s unlike anywhere else I’ve seen in the UK.

     
  7. Our Lady of Assistance (by jamescharlick)

    Église Notre-Dame-du-Bon-Secours, or in English the church of Our Lady of Assistance is originally a modest 12th century chapel that became too small for the growing Parish. The architects Pierre-Paul Merckx and Jean Corvrindt demolished the surrounding walls and built in 1669 the church we know of today. 

    They took inspiration from Italy when designing this church. The result was a very skillful combination of two styles produced a very interesting Baroque Flemish-Italian mix that differs a lot from the traditional Flemish style.

    A lack of ventilation means smoke from the prayer candles gathers in the dome, giving the church a surreal dream-like aspect.

     
  8. Sanctuary (by jamescharlick)

    The origins of Peterborough Cathedral can be traced back to King Peada of the Middle Angles who founded the first monastery on the site in 655AD. The monastic settlement was almost entirely destroyed by the Vikings in 870 and rebuilt as a Benedictine Abbey between 960 and 970. The Abbey church then survived Hereward the Wake’s attack on the Abbey in 1069, and remained intact until an accidental fire destroyed the second Abbey here in 1116. It was rebuilt in its present form between 1118 and 1238. It became the Cathedral of the new Diocese of Peterborough in 1541 and it is now known as the Cathedral Church of St Peter, St Paul and St Andrew.

     
  9. Ascend (by jamescharlick)

    It’s a bit of a struggle to find any details on this site - St. Hilarius / Monastere du Roi.

    It’s a part of a live site, and they’re obviously very used to finding rapscallions such as us snooping around inside. We bumped into a woman who, after asking us to leave, mentioned that “work” was starting the following week so we wouldn’t be able to get in after that. I don’t know the nature of the work, but I hope it’s to convert the monastery into a usable space again without  destroying a lot of what makes it charming and unique.

     
  10. The Sacred Law (by jamescharlick)

    The chapel of a now derelict masonic school, built by the freemasons in 1903 and used as a university from 1970, the site was finally closed in 2003 and has since been gradually converted for accommodation.

     
  11. Into His Marvellous Light (by jamescharlick)

    Chapel Rose was built between 1290 and 1308 as a convent and hospital, occupied by the Augustinian Sisters. Around 1600 the entire complex was destroyed by fire, after which it was rebuilt. The oldest parts that have been preserved date from that period. In the 19th century the south and west wings were partially demolished and rebuilt. 

     
  12. Turn My Darkness Into Light (by jamescharlick)

    The chapel of a now derelict masonic school, built by the freemasons in 1903 and used as a university from 1970, the site was finally closed in 2003 and has since been gradually converted for accommodation.

     
  13. Bless Ye The Lord (by jamescharlick)

    "Oh ye children of men, bless ye the lord, praise him and magnify him for ever."

    The chapel of a now derelict masonic school, built by the freemasons in 1903 and used as a university from 1970, the site was finally closed in 2003 and has since been gradually converted for accommodation.

     
  14. Sunset Sanctuary (by jamescharlick)

    Chapel Rose was built between 1290 and 1308 as a convent and hospital, occupied by the Augustinian Sisters. Around 1600 the entire complex was destroyed by fire, after which it was rebuilt. The oldest parts that have been preserved date from that period. In the 19th century the south and west wings were partially demolished and rebuilt. 

    This was certainly one of my highlights from our roadtrip.

     
  15. Immaculate (by jamescharlick)

    It’s a bit of a struggle to find any details on this site - St. Hilarius / Monastere du Roi. 

    It’s a part of a live site, and they’re obviously very used to finding rapscallions such as us snooping around inside. We bumped into a woman who, after asking us to leave, mentioned that “work” was starting the following week so we wouldn’t be able to get in after that. I don’t know the nature of the work, but I hope it’s to convert the monastery into a usable space again without  destroying a lot of what makes it charming and unique.