1. Yanov Railway Station, Chernobyl (by jamescharlick)

    Yanov station was the vital passenger pickup point for those arriving by train into Pripyat in the hours after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant catastrophe. The irradiated carriages and engines remain to this day.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  2. Pripyat Fun Fair Bumper Cars (by jamescharlick)

    Pripyat was the town built for the workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It has been a ghost town since the accident.

    The fun fair was due to open just days after the accident.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  3. Pripyat Kindergarten Window (by jamescharlick)

    Pripyat was the town built for the workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It has been a ghost town since the accident in 1986.

    This photo was taken in The Gold Key Kindergarten.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  4. Pripyat Tenement Blocks (by jamescharlick)

    Empty apartment balconies in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant workers village of Pripyat.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  5. Yanov Railway Station, Chernobyl (by jamescharlick)

    Yanov station was the vital passenger pickup point for those arriving by train into Pripyat in the hours after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant catastrophe. The irradiated carriages and engines remain to this day.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  6. Pripyat Overseer (by jamescharlick)

    Pripyat was the town built for the workers at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. It has been a ghost town since the accident in 1986.

    This photo was taken in the 16 story tenement building behind Fujiyama, clearly showing the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant looming over the town on the horizon.

    These images were taken in October 2011, I have been re-editing the series for a revamp of my portfolio and found several images I liked that went unused previously and thought I would share them here.

     
  7. I spent the weekend photographing my sister-in-laws wedding. What a beautiful, happy couple and a wonderful event. Best wishes for all that is to come!

     
  8. Citadel of Beauty (by jamescharlick)

    Banteay Srei is a 10th-century temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva, and is the only major Angkor temple not built by a monarch. It is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today.

    The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a “precious gem”, or the “jewel of Khmer art.”

    The temple was only discovered in 1914, and restoration work began in 1930. Since it’s discover Banteay Srei has been the victim of much art theft and vandalism, and several original statues have been removed and replaced with replicas for their safe-keeping.

     
  9. Forgotten Monuments II (by jamescharlick)

    Indein is one of the many small villages populating the bank of Inle Lake. A Buddha Image has been enshrined at a whitewashed pagoda on the summit of the hill above the village, and below this around the hill are hundreds of ancient crumbling stupas.

    This pagoda’s history is shrouded in mystery, indeed the locals themselves have no knowledge of its’ origin or history, and Myanmar historical records make no mention of its construction. One popular theory puts its beginnings at 200 – 300 BC but there’s no archaeological evidence to support that theory.

    The stupas vary in their degree of degradation, from complete or fully restored near the main temple at the summit to mounds of earth and small heaps of crumbled brick that formed the foundation of the structures towards the bottom of the hill.

    The beautiful ornate sculpting around the archway provides an interesting contrast to the exposed and crumbling brick with various plants thriving in between. Inside would once have been a buddha statue or relic of a special monk for the locals to worship, but many of these have been damaged or removed.

     
  10. Fishing Ha Long (by jamescharlick)

    The name Hạ Long is derived from the Sino-Vietnamese, meaning “descending dragon”. According to local legend, when Vietnam had just started to develop into a country, they had to fight against invaders. To assist the Vietnamese in defending their country, the gods sent a family of dragons as protectors who began spitting out jewels and jade. These jewels turned into the islands and islets dotting the bay, linking together to form a great wall against the invaders. Numerous rock mountains abruptly appeared on the sea ahead of invaders’ ships and the forward ships struck the rocks and each other.

    Ha Long Bay features thousands of limestone karsts and isles in various sizes and shapes, including 1,960–2,000 islets, most of which are limestone and many of which are hollow. The core of the bay has an area of 334 km2 with a high density of 775 islets. A community of around 1,600 people live on Hạ Long Bay in four fishing villages: Cửa Vạn, Ba Hang, Cống Tàu and Vông Viêng in Hùng Thắng commune, Hạ Long city. They live on floating houses and are sustained through fishing and marine aquaculture (cultivating marine biota), plying the shallow waters for 200 species of fish and 450 different kinds of mollusks.

     
  11. Sulamani Elephant Fresco (by jamescharlick)

    Bagan is an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma (Myanmar). From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan, the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom’s height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

    Sulamani Pahto is one of Bagan’s premier temple attractions, the name itself meaning ‘Crowning Jewel’ or ‘Small Ruby.’ The numerous original unique glazed roundels and panels along the plinth and terrace moldings add joy and exuberance to the exterior, while the rich frescoes on the stuccoed interior ambulatory(from the 12th to 19th centuries)—though damaged—with their lively depiction of both the sublime and the grotesque reflect a constant interplay of the physical and mythical light and darkness.

    This was one of several elephant frescos found in the deep window recesses, although many are damaged by crumbling plaster or faded by the direct sunlight. As the paint is worn back to the original plaster you can see the brush or finger strokes applied for the background and elephant colouring. I believe the dot patterns around the face are from an earlier fresco which was painted over.

     
  12. Overgrowth (by jamescharlick)

    Preah Khan is a 12th Century temple at Angkor, Cambodia, and was the centre of a substantial organisation, with almost 100,000 officials and servants. The temple is flat in design, with a basic plan of successive rectangular galleries around a Buddhist sanctuary complicated by Hindu satellite temples and numerous later additions.

    Preah Khan was built on the battle site where King Jaya-varman VII finally defeated the Chams, and as such the name translates as Royal Sword or Holy Sword. It is largely unrestored, however some clearing and cleaning of the site has taken place to preserve the temple and make it accessible to visitors.

    I think this is looking towards the East Gate from inside the compound.

     
  13. Burnished Plains (by jamescharlick)

    Bagan is an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma (Myanmar). From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan, the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom’s height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

     
  14. Le Mans Classic 1971 Matra 670 (by jamescharlick)

    I’ve just got back from the Le Mans Classic 2014, my first visit to Le Mans but we were already thinking about a return trip before we’d even left. It was a great weekend and I learned a lot about panning photography (through trial and error!)

    This was my favorite corner for photography, partly because there wasn’t a safety mesh fence in the way and partly because of the blue and yellow stripes framing the front and rear of the circuit at this point.

    The car is listed as a 1971 Matra 660-01, but the decals are from a 670. I wouldn’t know the difference anyway. But it sounded fantastic, high revving and high pitched, it sounded more like an F1 car than the throatier rumbles of the rest of this era.

    This was shot at 1/50s 135mm (APS C) if you’re curious.

     
  15. A Forest of Spires (by jamescharlick)

    Indein is one of the many small villages populating the bank of Inle Lake. A Buddha Image has been enshrined at a whitewashed pagoda on the summit of the hill above the village, and below this around the hill are hundreds of ancient crumbling stupas.

    This pagoda’s history is shrouded in mystery, indeed the locals themselves have no knowledge of its’ origin or history, and Myanmar historical records make no mention of its construction. One popular theory puts its beginnings at 200 – 300 BC but there’s no archaeological evidence to support that theory.

    The stupas vary in their degree of degradation, from complete or fully restored near the main temple at the summit to mounds of earth and small heaps of crumbled brick that formed the foundation of the structures towards the bottom of the hill.

    Once whitewashed sculpted render formed layered rings and an archway with brick structure beneath exposed at the foundation. Inside would once have been a buddha statue or relic of a special monk for the locals to worship, but many of these have been damaged or removed.